Indian Transplant Newsletter. Vol.18 Issue No.57. July 2019 - October 2019

Pallavi Kumar summits Mount Kilimanjaro as her tribute to organ donors and their families


Pallavi Kumar summits Mount Kilimanjaro as her tribute to organ donors and their families

 

On October 03, 2019, Ms. Pallavi Kumar, Executive Director, MOHAN Foundation summited Mount Kilimanjaro and unfurled a flag expressing
her tribute to organ donors for their selfless act of giving a part of themselves to keep others alive. This is the highest such tribute by any Indian and
perhaps from anywhere in the world. Last year, Pallavi summited the Everest Base Camp reaching an altitude of 5380 meters (17600 feet above
sea level). This year she climbed higher 5756 meters (18885 feet above sea level) as she feels no tribute is too high for organ donors and their
families.
Standing at a height of 5,895 meters, Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest peak of Africa and the tallest freestanding mountain on Earth. Also known
as the “Roof of Africa”, this colossal mountain is a part of the seven summits of the world. Pallavi says, “It was a very challenging and demanding
hike over 6 days on the Machame route. The summit night on Kilimanjaro was intense. We began at 2 am from 1,245m (4,084ft.) of ascent into
extreme altitude above 5,500m (18,000ft). It took more than 8 hours to reach the summit and I had serious issues with breathing, fatigue and
cold. The oxygen levels were so low that every step was a herculean task but what kept me going was my strong need to reach the top and the
inspiration I took from families who have made this tough choice in their hour of grief and loss. It was a very special moment when I could finally
display the flag expressing my gratitude to organ donors. It made it seem all worth the effort.”

On October 03, 2019, Ms. Pallavi Kumar, Executive Director, MOHAN Foundation summited Mount Kilimanjaro and unfurled a flag expressing her tribute to organ donors for their selfless act of giving a part of themselves to keep others alive. This is the highest such tribute by any Indian and perhaps from anywhere in the world. Last year, Pallavi summited the Everest Base Camp reaching an altitude of 5380 meters (17600 feet above sea level). This year she climbed higher 5756 meters (18885 feet above sea level) as she feels no tribute is too high for organ donors and their families.

Standing at a height of 5,895 meters, Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest peak of Africa and the tallest freestanding mountain on Earth. Also known as the “Roof of Africa”, this colossal mountain is a part of the seven summits of the world. Pallavi says, “It was a very challenging and demanding hike over 6 days on the Machame route. The summit night on Kilimanjaro was intense. We began at 2 am from 1,245m (4,084ft.) of ascent into extreme altitude above 5,500m (18,000ft). It took more than 8 hours to reach the summit and I had serious issues with breathing, fatigue and cold. The oxygen levels were so low that every step was a herculean task but what kept me going was my strong need to reach the top and the inspiration I took from families who have made this tough choice in their hour of grief and loss. It was a very special moment when I could finally display the flag expressing my gratitude to organ donors. It made it seem all worth the effort.”

 


How to cite this article:
- Shroff S, Navin S. Pallavi Kumar summits Mount Kilimanjaro as her tribute to organ donors and their families. Indian Transplant Newsletter. Vol.18 Issue No.57. July 2019 - October 2019

How to cite this URL:
- Shroff S, Navin S. Pallavi Kumar summits Mount Kilimanjaro as her tribute to organ donors and their families. Indian Transplant Newsletter. Vol.18 Issue No.57. July 2019 - October 2019; Available at :
https://www.itnnews.co.in/indian-transplant-newsletter/issue57/Pallavi-Kumar-summits-Mount-Kilimanjaro-as-her-tribute-to-organ-donors-and-their-families-943.htm

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