Indian Transplant Newsletter. Vol.18 Issue No.57. July 2019 - October 2019

Rise in organ donation among the BAME community in UK


 

NHS Blood and Transplant, UK has encouraging news – there were
121 deceased donors from the black, Asian and minority ethnic
(BAME) community last year, the highest number to date. The number
of donations has increased by 51% in the last five years. Donor
ethnicity plays an important role in a successful transplant. But
relatively few people from BAME backgrounds sign up, resulting in a
disproportionate number of minorities on transplant waiting lists. In all,
32% of those on the waiting list were from BAME backgrounds, though
about 13% of the general population is BAME. Just 8% of all deceased
donors were from these communities last year. The data also revealed
that only 42% of BAME families agreed to organ donation by a
deceased relative when asked in hospitals, compared with 71% of
families from a white background. The most common reasons given
for refusal among BAME groups is not knowing if a relative wanted to
be a donor, or religious and cultural beliefs. When families do not have
a discussion or conversation about organ donation, it is a lost
opportunity to save lives.

NHS Blood and Transplant, UK has encouraging news – there were 121 deceased donors from the black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) community last year, the highest number to date. The number of donations has increased by 51% in the last five years. Donor ethnicity plays an important role in a successful transplant. But relatively few people from BAME backgrounds sign up, resulting in a disproportionate number of minorities on transplant waiting lists. In all, 32% of those on the waiting list were from BAME backgrounds, though about 13% of the general population is BAME. Just 8% of all deceased donors were from these communities last year. The data also revealed that only 42% of BAME families agreed to organ donation by a deceased relative when asked in hospitals, compared with 71% of families from a white background. The most common reasons given for refusal among BAME groups is not knowing if a relative wanted to be a donor, or religious and cultural beliefs. When families do not have a discussion or conversation about organ donation, it is a lost opportunity to save lives.

 

 


How to cite this article:
- Shroff S, Navin S. Rise in organ donation among the BAME community in UK. Indian Transplant Newsletter. Vol.18 Issue No.57. July 2019 - October 2019

How to cite this URL:
- Shroff S, Navin S. Rise in organ donation among the BAME community in UK. Indian Transplant Newsletter. Vol.18 Issue No.57. July 2019 - October 2019; Available at :
https://www.itnnews.co.in/indian-transplant-newsletter/issue57/Rise-in-organ-donation-among-the-BAME-community-in-UK-927.htm

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  • Keywords: BAME